The Complete Guide to Frame Relay Subinterfaces and Split Horizon

Are you looking for a comprehensive guide to Frame Relay Subinterfaces and Split Horizon? Look no further! This blog post will provide you with a complete overview of Frame Relay Subinterfaces and Split Horizon, including their functions, benefits, and how to implement them in a Cisco CCNA / CCNP Certification Exam Lab. By the end of this blog post, you should have a solid understanding of Frame Relay Subinterfaces and Split Horizon and how to use them to your advantage. So let’s get started!

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Configuring Frame Relay Subinterfaces
Frame Relay subinterfaces are a great way to reduce the administrative overhead associated with configuring multiple Frame Relay connections over a single physical interface. In addition, using subinterfaces can allow for logical separation of networks, including Split Horizon processing. To configure Frame Relay subinterfaces, there are several steps to take.

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First, you will need to create the subinterfaces on your router. This is done by typing in interface [physical interface] and then encapsulation frame-relay followed by exit. Once you have your subinterfaces created, you need to assign each one an IP address, which is done by typing in ip address [ip address] [subnet mask] followed by exit.

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Next, you must configure the Frame Relay encapsulation type. This is done by typing in frame-relay map ip [ip address] [DLCI] broadcast followed by exit. This command will tell the router which IP address to associate with each data-link connection identifier (DLCI). Finally, you must enable Split Horizon on your subinterfaces by typing in no ip split-horizon followed by exit. This will ensure that routes broadcasted out of one interface will not be propagated back into the same interface.
Once you have completed these steps, you will have successfully configured Frame Relay subinterfaces and enabled Split Horizon. With these tools, you can now reduce the administrative overhead associated with configuring multiple Frame Relay connections over a single physical interface while keeping your network logically separated.

Enabling Split Horizon
Split horizon is an important part of configuring Frame Relay subinterfaces. It is designed to prevent routing loops by preventing a route from being advertised back out of the same interface that it came in on. This can be enabled in two different ways: on a per-interface basis, or globally.
To enable split horizon on a per-interface basis, you’ll need to use the ip split-horizon command. This command will only affect traffic sent out of that specific interface. To enable it globally, you’ll need to use the ip classless command. With this command, split horizon will be enabled on all interfaces.
It’s important to note that split horizon isn’t always necessary when using Frame Relay subinterfaces. In most cases, it’s best to leave it disabled and only enable it when absolutely necessary.